Saturday, August 20, 2016

it's not vapid optimism, it's just math.

I haven't had anything to say lately. I've been consumed in trying to make sense of a lot of the tragedy, devastation, and hate in the world. Words just haven't come easy. I don't feel like anything I say is enough to express my disdain for the hatred that seems to be accelerated by the fact that it's an election year, my sympathy for the victims of the countless tragedies occurring, and my confusion at how I can make anything any better. 

I was listening to a podcast this morning on my way to work. I've grown quite fond of listening to the podcasts of the sermons from the House for All Sinners and Saints when I'm grasping for answers. I've struggled with my faith over the years. A lot of personal loss and grief and my struggle with the hypocritical faithful has made being a part of any sort of organized religion a challenge for me. The House for All Sinners and Saints is not your typical "church" though. They preach a message of love and acceptance. They practice what they preach. They make it hard for even a cynic like me to doubt that God sends us messages. 

I got a message sent to me this morning in the form of a sermon that I listened to. 


Just 13 short minutes made my soul feel like someone gave me a really good hug and said, "it's all going to be ok, and yes, you can do something about it."

So today, I'm going to do what I can to celebrate the good and the kind. 

I'm going to take donations to our local animal shelter that just received a group of homeless animals that were displaced by the flooding in Lousiana. I'm going to donate to Doctors without Borders and try to do my small part in helping the courageous medical workers that are saving lives in war zones. I'm going to schedule a time to volunteer at a local organization that can use help doing something, anything. I'm going to offer my help to my friends suffering the floods in Louisiana and I'm going to share some links here that are little ways that you can do good for the world. If you're reading this...listen to the podcast, hug someone that you care about, and be positive that you can make a difference. 

So, thank you, Nadia Bolz-Weber, for bringing me back around to where I needed to be this morning. Thank you for shifting my perspective and refocusing my objectives. 

"The center of human nature is rooted in ten thousand ordinary acts of kindness that define our days."
-Stephen Jay Gould